In early June, the Bloomington City Council voted to boycott Arizona because of its new immigration law that targeted anyone who looked "illegal." Until I saw the Bloomington chamber's June 10 gutless response to rescind the city council's call for the boycott of Arizona because of the e-mails from outsiders who said they would boycott Bloomington businesses, I thought: "How heroic and progressive Bloomington was to go against the red-necked tide of the majority who support Arizona's actions."

Despite the Bloomington chamber's spineless, self-centered, self-serving actions, my family will make a point to visit Bloomington because it boycotts Arizona. Because of this brave decision, we plan to encourage our friends and family to visit, too, and encourage others to do the same.

"Despite the Bloomington chamber's spineless, self-centered, self-serving actions, my family will make a point to visit Bloomington because it boycotts Arizona."
What if the black community decided not to boycott businesses or bus systems in the civil rights movement because it would be "Too much of a hardship"?

Chamber members miss the point that a boycott means sacrificing something for the betterment of the whole -- not just your little piece of the world. That is the problem with this country. We've adopted the attitude that, "What is good for business is good for all." The banking crisis and the BP oil spill are proof of how misguided this approach has been.

We should boycott more, not less, targeting states and mega corporations -- and not back down because the fight is just too hard on our pocketbooks.

Avon Waters is "a gringo whose family was one of the original immigrants 350 years ago." He lives in Converse, Ind., and can be reached at avonwaters@yahoo.com.